PUBLISHED WORKS

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The emergence of a distinctive indigenous Scottish school of painting in the 18th century coincided with a period when Scottish society and culture were beginning to extend their influence worldwide. In fields as diverse as laws, philosophy, architecture, and science, Scots offered new and innovative approaches that helped to form the modern age . . .

SCOTTISH ARTISTS IN NORTH AMERICA

1714 - 1946

Benjamin Franklin, David Martin

2021 | Journal of the Scottish Society for Art History

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The history of the Highlands of Scotland and its inhabitants during the nineteenth century is a history of upheaval, loss, and myth-making. Emigration on an unprecedented scale transformed, within a generation, a society that had endured for hundreds of years. As the biggest movement of population in British history, it was superficially rich with material for the genre or history painter . . . .

LOCHABER NO MORE

LANDSCAPE, EMIGRATION, AND THE SCOTTISH ARTIST 1849-95

Lochaber No More, John Watson Nicol

2008 | Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide

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Portraits and satirical engravings offer insights into the differing ways in which tartan was used, displayed, and adopted as an expression of identity during the period 1746–1822. From being the cloth of Jacobitism, tartan became the cloth of the loyal Highlander, fighting for the Hanoverian crown; from being the cloth of an Enlightenment 'natural man', it became the garb of the vilified Lord Bute and rapacious Scots in general; from being an exotic 'foreign' costume at a London masquerade, it became the costume of nascent Scottish nationalism, a role which it retains to this day.

FROM RAMSAY'S FLORA MACDONALD  TO RAEBURN'S MACNAB

THE USE OF TARTAN AS A SYMBOL OF IDENTITY

Flora Macdonald, Allan Ramsay

2005 | Textile History 36:2

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'FROM FEVER TO FRESH AIR'

THE EVERGREEN, THE YELLOW BOOK, AND THE THREAT OF DECADENCE

The Evergreen

2004 | Journal of the Scottish Society for Art History

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ENGRAVED JACOBITE GLASSES

A Diamond Point Engraved Jacobite Wine Glass, circa 1745

June 2003 | The Magazine Antiques

Robin Nicholson, in an article on 'Engraved Jacobite Glasses' for The Magazine Antiques, June 2003, cites an Oxford newspaper of 1753 where an imaginary account of a Jacobite club meeting is given: '....The Society being met and the cut Glasses representing the Figure of the Young Chevalier drest in Plaid being brought in, a Bottle to each Member was coiled for. The following Toasts were then proposed from the Chair and drank round by the Company: The King, the Prince, the Duke, Speedy, and Happy, down with the Rump, Damnation to Hanover, Optima Dido, and many others'.

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HIGHLAND HABITS

THE ICONOGRAPHY OF THE SOBIESKI STUARTS

John and Charles Sobieski Stuart

2003 | Scottish Studies Review 4:2

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Prince Charles Edward Stuart, studio of Antonio David

BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE AND THE MAKING OF A MYTH

A STUDY IN PORTRAITURE, 1720 - 1892

2002 | Bucknell University Press

“A closely argued and perceptive study, which will be a valuable source of reference for all who are interested in 18th-century portraiture..” Journal of the Scottish Society for Art History


“Excellent…blends a formidable knowledge of Jacobite and eighteenth-century history with art history…a substantial contribution to the material culture history of a European court” Biography


“Nicholson’s range, sharpness, and attention to detail are impressive to the point of being delightful…” British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies

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The popular and abiding image of Prince Charles Edward Stuart is that of a figure dressed in tartan. This tartan-clad, and usually be-kilted, individual has assumed a central place in the abiding mythologies of Scottish history and, moreover, has become something of a visual metaphor for the Jacobite prince and his aspirations . . . . 

THE TARTAN PORTRAITS OF PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD STUART

IDENTITY AND ICONOGRAPHY

Bonnie Prince Charlie Entering the Ballroom at Holyroodhouse, John Pettie

1998 | British Journal of Eighteenth-Century Studies Vol 21